Author Topic: JDWS -- J.D.W. Sugar  (Read 12794 times)

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Offline jahangir

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JDWS -- J.D.W. Sugar
« Reply #-1 on: December 23, 2010, 11:54:34 AM »
for short term @ 85 with eps of 9M RS 22  hold till result 10-15% gain expected  :goodc:


D.W. Sugar Mills Limited   28 July 2010
02:49 PM
(PKT +5:00GMT)   EPS = 22.40
PROFIT/LOSS BEFORE TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 1,807.733
FINANCIAL RESULT FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED 30/06/2010
PROFIT/LOSS AFTER TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 975.368
J.D.W. Sugar Mills Limited   27 May 2010
03:17 PM
(PKT +5:00GMT)   
BOOK CLOSURE TO 28/06/2010
BOOK CLOSURE FROM 22/06/2010
FINANCIAL RESULT FOR THE HALF YEAR ENDED 31/03/2010
EPS = 18.68
PROFIT/LOSS AFTER TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 813.487
PROFIT/LOSS BEFORE TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 1,572.744
RIGHT ISSUE = 12.5% AT A PREMIUM OF Rs.55/= PER SHARE
J.D.W. Sugar Mills Limited   25 January 2010
03:14 PM
(PKT +5:00GMT)   EPS = 12.15
PROFIT/LOSS AFTER TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 537.918
PROFIT/LOSS BEFORE TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 1,033.073
FINANCIAL RESULT FOR THE FIRST QUARTER ENDED 31/12/2009


sorry but i can't find the jdws at forum   
« Last Edit: February 22, 2014, 08:34:16 PM by M&M »

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JDWS -- J.D.W. Sugar
« Reply #-1 on: December 23, 2010, 11:54:34 AM »

Offline jahangir

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« on: December 23, 2010, 12:23:33 PM »

 stoploss@ between 77-78

Offline buy.high.sell.low

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2010, 12:29:43 PM »
average vol 1.5k?

Offline jahangir

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2010, 12:34:44 PM »
yes only 5% to 10% of  funds can be invested

Offline jahangir

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Offline SBM

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2012, 12:45:54 PM »
Agribusiness: JDW Sugar aims for global competitiveness
By Shahram Haq
Published: May 21, 2012

JDW claims to have a crushing efficiency of 72% in its largest unit, higher than any other mill in Pakistan. PHOTO: FILE
LAHORE:
Despite operating in a highly protected market, JDW Sugar Mills Managing Director Jahangir Tareen seems remarkably obsessed with building a globally competitive business, even as he continues to advocate government protection for his industry.
“I came into this business with a vision to compete with the world, not just local firms,” said Tareen in an exclusive interview with The Express Tribune.
Tareen appears to back up his word with at least some actions. The company regularly sends its technical staff to Australia and South Africa to acquire training on how to better manage the business and run their mill more efficiently. “Compared to other sugar mills, my team is the most efficient,” said Tareen, a former federal industries minister.
And unlike many of its competitors, JDW (which stands for Jamal Din Wala) is actually interested in growing its business. The company acquired two units in 2007 to enhance its production capacity, a move that saw its revenues and profits more than double in the next fiscal year that ended September 30, 2008.
As of right now, however, JDW has no plans to grow by acquisition. “We are in no mood to acquire or invest in some other mills,” said Tareen. “We are working on making our own units more energy-efficient so as to enhance our own production capacity.”
That singular obsession with efficiency appears to be yielding results. JDW claims to have a crushing efficiency of 72% in its largest unit, higher than any other mill in Pakistan, which has helped the firm drive down its operating costs and boosting profits. In addition, the firm is looking to use more and more of the waste produced in the sugar manufacturing process to enhance its electricity generation.
While most sugar mills in Pakistan (and around the world) generate power this way, JDW’s ambitions seem a little higher. The company plans to enhance its power production capacity up to 150 megawatts. That would be far beyond its own needs, which would allow JDW to sell power to the grid.
JDW is also one of the very few firms in Pakistan that is actively pursuing a backward integration process: the group’s parent company has dramatically enhanced its production of sugarcane, which allows JDW to purchase up to 20% of the sugarcane it uses from its own farms, which it claims yield up to 44% more sugarcane than the national average.
This obsession with efficiency is perhaps explained by rising operating costs, which have been eating into the company’s profit margins. JDW’s operating margin dropped from a high of 18.3% in 2009 to 13.3% in 2011. Nonetheless, the company is by far the largest and most profitable sugar manufacturer in the country. In financial year 2011, its gross sales were Rs26.5 billion, earning the company a net profit of Rs1.3 billion.
Yet even as it tries to portray itself as an aspiring globally competitive business, JDW appears comfortable with its place within a government-protected industry, where provincial governments set prices for sugarcane and the government buys up much of the end product on generous terms. “The current pricing mechanism protects the grower,” said Tareen, a former federal cabinet member and currently slated as the economic policy guru for the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaaf.
As for the relations between JDW and the sugarcane growers in Ghotki and Rahimyar Khan from whom it buys 80% of its feedstock, the company claims to be better than its competitors when it comes to paying them on time. “We pay within seven to 15 days after the crushing season ends,” said Tareen.
Growers seem to agree. “Tareen is a good paymaster,” said Ghulam Mustafa Chaniho, a farmer based in Sindh. “Certainly much better than others who have not paid farmers in four to five years.”
The stock has recently been underperforming the broader market, up 17.5% since the beginning of the year compared to the KSE-100 index’s 22.1%. Over the long run, however, JDW has handily outperformed the broader market, earning investors an average of 45.3% per year for the last ten years, compared to the KSE-100 index’s 22.8%.
With additional reporting by Farooq Tirmizi in Karachi.
Published in The Express Tribune, May 21st, 2012.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/381696/agribusiness-jdw-sugar-aims-for-global-competitiveness/
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Offline engrusama

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2012, 02:18:24 PM »
Some of the best stocks in KSE have very low volumes...

makes it that much harder to trade in them.

Offline SBM

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2012, 07:19:58 PM »
Some of the best stocks in KSE have very low volumes...

makes it that much harder to trade in them.

Yes, MFFL and NATF have both outperformed efoods by significant margins in the last year. But really low and choppy volumes for both.
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Offline Saiti

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2012, 08:59:22 AM »
found it interesting ............
For Tareen, a jet for political use, household staff as directors
The Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf has bragged about its technocratic duo of Jahangir Tareen and Asad Umar as competent managers with private sector experience who are ready to lead the economy. Yet, new information about corporate governance practices at JDW Sugar, where Tareen is CEO, are beginning to cast doubts over that image of competence on at least one half of that duo.
The Express Tribune has learnt that Tareen has often used company property – especially the corporate jet – for personal and political campaigning purposes, and managed to escape fiduciary scrutiny by appointing figureheads, including some of his own personal household staff, as members of the board of directors of the company.
JDW Sugar Mills is the largest and most profitable sugar manufacturer in the country, and is a publicly listed company, with shares traded on the Karachi Stock Exchange. For the financial year ending September 30, 2011, the company had gross revenues of nearly Rs26.5 billion and a net income of Rs1.3 billion.
Tareen’s political opponents in the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz, however, allege that the billionaire businessman-turned-politician has been using the corporate jet for political purposes, flying fellow members of the PTI around the country at the expense of a company in which Tareen and his son own only a combined 42.1%, with the remainder owned by institutional investors and the general public.
When contacted for comment, Tareen denied that the jet was ever used for political purposes, though he did say that he occasionally uses the plane for personal purposes and reimburses the company every six months. He went on to claim that his previous payment to the company for the use of the plane came to Rs15 million. Regardless of whether the plane was used for political purposes, the more serious allegations against Tareen’s management of JDW Sugar is that he has packed the board of directors with personal employees, including some people who do not have the educational or technical qualifications or experience to be able to execute their fiduciary responsibilities to the company’s other shareholders.
A company’s board of directors is meant to regulate the behaviour of its executives. As the largest shareholder, Tareen does have the right to pick the largest number of board members, but he seems to have gone out of his way to pick people who would not ask too many questions on behalf of the minority shareholders.
For instance, a man named Abdul Ghaffar is listed on the board of directors for financial year 2010. He appears to have only a primary school education and serves as a waiter in Tareen’s personal residence in Lahore. When contacted for comment, Abdul Ghaffar said he had no knowledge of owning any shares in the company, let alone attending the 10 board meetings that company records say he did as a member of the board.
Tareen points out that Ghaffar is no longer on the board of directors, but the list for 2011 and 2012 includes the name Muhammad Ismail, who is reportedly a cook in the Tareen personal residence in Lahore. Incidentally, Muhammad Ismail is also listed as a member of the board’s audit committee, which is supposed to scrutinise its financial records.
The JDW Sugar board of directors has eight members. Two are Tareen and his wife. Two others are Tareen’s brother-in-law, Makhdoom Ahmad Mahmood and his wife. Ahmad Mahmood is the second biggest shareholder in JDW Sugar, owning about 19.4% of the company. He is also the chairman of the board.
The other four board members are supposed to represent the minority shareholders in the company, but since none of the other shareholders has more than a 10% share in the company, they do not have the right to nominate directors. As a result, the other four directors are all either personal employees of Tareen, or in the case of Ijaz Ahmed Phulpoto, an old personal friend.
Political fallout
Sources familiar with the matter told The Express Tribune that Ahmed Mahmood, once considered Tareen’s political mentor, has had a falling out with his brother-in-law over differences on how to run the company. Mahmood backed Tareen twice for a seat in the National Assembly from his home constituency in Rahimyar Khan, which some believe Tareen could not have won without Mahmood’s blessing.
Mahmood was reportedly suing Tareen over several of these issues, but the two reportedly reached an amicable settlement earlier this year brokered by mutual friends and financial institutions with stakes in the company, as a result of which Abdul Ghaffar was kicked off the board of directors and replaced by Mahmood’s wife. Mahmood also appears to be getting considerably more compensation as chairman of the board than he was the year before. Nonetheless, Tareen’s appointees still dominate the board of directors.
Published in The Express Tribune, November 23rd, 2012.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/470036/corporate-governance-for-tareen-a-jet-for-political-use-household-staff-as-directors/

Offline Saiti

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2012, 09:02:06 AM »
Jahangir cheeta hey... He hired his cook and a waiter as directors in jdws ... Mujhe bhi idea mil gaya hey.

Offline space

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2012, 10:57:16 AM »
@waseem82 I hope you understand why some investors are reluctant while investing in this FAMILY RUN BUSINESS ;)
Portfolio : I try to adhere to Div 40% Growth 20% Midterm Play 13%  Daily Masti Items 7% CASH 20%

Offline Farzooq

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2013, 11:08:41 PM »
J.D.W. Sugar Mills Limited
(JDWS)

January 3rd, 2013
02:29:12 PM

FINANCIAL RESULT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30/09/2012
PROFIT/LOSS BEFORE TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 548.280
PROFIT/LOSS AFTER TAXATION RS. IN MILLION 687.274
EPS = 11.50
DIVIDEND = 60%
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING WILL BE HELD ON 31/01/2013
BOOK CLOSURE FROM 24/01/2013
BOOK CLOSURE TO 31/01/2013
TOP PICKS
Engro fatima ogdc pol pso dgkc mlcf kapco npl ubl atrl nml efoods aicl hcar searl

Offline SBM

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2013, 10:37:04 AM »
I hate waking up.

Offline Abdul Qadir

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2013, 08:02:37 PM »
Trading at very attractive levels below 100.

Offline Saiti

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2013, 10:58:25 PM »
Trading at very attractive levels below 100.

What about noon sugar?

Offline saifullahkhan7

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2013, 05:24:15 PM »
Trading at very attractive levels below 100.

What about noon sugar?

It's a good buy at present price, but one has to hold for 7 - 8 months. The Ideal Money (if you have any!) will be Safe here.
Trust in God! & Candle Sticks, Bollinger Bands and looking into  2 Yrs EPS/DPS helps!!!

Offline SBM

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2013, 03:35:14 PM »
I hate waking up.

Offline SBM

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I hate waking up.

Offline SBM

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2013, 12:49:10 PM »
I hate waking up.

Offline SBM

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Re: JDWS -- J.d.w.sugar
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2013, 05:15:43 AM »
« Last Edit: August 04, 2013, 05:18:57 AM by ouulman »
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